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Over spring break, I read a Bryan Caplan’s very popular book, "The Case Against Higher Education." Many readers of this column might suppose I’d like this book. I tend to support smaller government, and am a frequent critic of higher education. Recall that I’m the professor who thinks tenure…

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I became active in politics in the late 1950s, got elected to Congress in 1964, and have remained engaged in one way or another every year since then. I’ve had a ringside seat for a long time. So I suppose I should not be surprised that I get asked a lot these days how American politics have…

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How fast can our economy grow? We often answer this question by talking about spending. Will people buy more consumer goods? Will businesses buy more equipment? What about spending by government and the rest of the world?

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Job quality, especially with respect to wages and benefits, will be a central part of the next national election. With job creation strong but wage growth lagging, we should expect tough questions about a variety of labor market policies. This will be especially true in the few states that h…

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One of the more-endearing features of working at a research university is the seemingly endless well of available knowledge. The library, which sits unassumingly just a few steps from my office, is a gateway to nearly all the known world. Far more impressive is the constant creation of new k…

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As various House committees gear up for a season of investigations and hearings on President Trump and his administration, a lot of people are worried that progress on the nation’s challenges will grind to a halt. I would argue just the opposite: the wheels of government are turning in favor…

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It’s been many decades now, but I still remember a piece of advice I got not long after entering Congress. It came in passing from a prominent journalist as we were talking about the bewildering array of issues Congress faced. Every day, he told me, I should ask myself a simple question: “Wh…

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As 2019 begins anew, economists suggest a softening national economy. Industrial production is in decline and retail sales dropped in December. Consumers even shifted their purchases to Walmart, signaling lowered expectations about the economy.

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News permeates our lives. In the words of Supreme Court Justice Mahlon Pitney, it's "the history of the day." We consume it constantly and analyze it endlessly. We debate its value and its veracity. But here's another aspect to discuss: Can we own it? And should we be able to?

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Indiana reformed its local income taxes during the 2015 legislative session, and the new set-up took effect in 2017. The old income tax acronyms, CAGIT, COIT, EDIT, and LOIT, were no more. Now we have LIT, for local income tax, with a single rate and a collection of revenue buckets for vario…

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One of the more striking political developments of the last few years has been the partisan sorting of American voters. It used to be that both the Republican and Democratic parties covered some ideological ground. Now, it’s so habitual for conservatives to make their home in the GOP and lib…

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Last week the Brookings Institution released yet another study that should be read aloud in every Hoosier school, city council and in the General Assembly. This study was an examination of the automation risks to employment across the nation. It is worth discussing the findings, with a focus…

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The past few weeks have contained more reports of newspaper downsizing at metro daily papers in Indiana. This news involved some of our state’s largest daily print publications, but it is a familiar story affecting papers large and small in the age of the internet.

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Over a lifetime in politics, I’ve met a lot of interesting, impressive politicians. But those I truly admired were men and women who were adept at the arts both of politics and legislating — a rarer combination of talents than you’d hope for in our representative democracy. They’re a reminde…

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Looking back at 2018’s weather-related news, it seems clear that this was the year climate change became unavoidable. I don’t mean that the fires in California, coastal flooding in the Carolinas, and drought throughout the West were new evidence of climate change. Rather, they shifted the na…

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WASHINGTON — As the first two years of President Donald Trump's administration close, Republican allies still haven't figured out how best to influence a leader who takes cues from the forces that swept him to office and seems to fear losing them above all else.

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Hardly a day goes by when I don’t speak with someone about their area’s growing or shrinking economy. Much of the time my conversations are with business people or with folks who think about the economic vitality of a region much like that of a business. One difficult part of every such conv…

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Those of us who debate policy often draw a bright line between domestic and foreign policy, as if they exist in separate worlds. But in fact they are closely linked. Our success or failure in one policy sphere will influence the other.

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