Agent: Cowboys star Elliott tested positive for coronavirus

Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott has tested positive for the coronavirus, according to his agent.

Rocky Arceneaux told the NFL Network on Monday that Elliott was feeling OK and recovering. Arceneaux did not immediately return messages seeking comment, but a person with direct knowledge of the diagnosis told The Associated Press that Elliott had the positive test about a week ago and could be described as symptomatic. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the person wasn't authorized to discuss Elliott's diagnosis publicly.

The Cowboys declined to comment, citing privacy laws.

Only players who have been rehabilitating injuries have been allowed inside team facilities during the pandemic shutdown. That hasn't included Elliott.

The NFL is in the process of establishing protocols for the return of players, including what would happen in the case of positive tests, but there is no timetable for their return. Training camps are supposed to start in a little more than a month.

Several players have gone public with their diagnosis, including star Denver pass rusher Von Miller. Los Angeles Rams center Brian Allen was the first to publicly acknowledge a positive test, on April 15.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms that clear up within weeks. But for others, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, the highly contagious virus can cause severe symptoms and even death.

The 24-year-old Elliott has led the NFL in rushing twice in his first four seasons. He missed all of training camp last year in a contract holdout, eventually signing a $90 million, six-year extension a few days before the start of the season.

Big Ten commissioner starts voter registration initiative

The Big Ten has created a voter registration initiative to go along with its Anti-Hate and Anti-Racism Coalition, hoping its 14 schools and thousands of student-athletes can leverage their platform to spur social change.

The Big Ten's Kevin Warren, the first black commissioner of a Power Five conference, said the announcement Monday of the voting initiative finalizes plans that have been in the works since February.

Warren says he hopes the nonpartisan program will encourage student-athletes to become part of the electoral process. It will include participants from each Big Ten school with monthly programming, beginning in July and ending with the general election in November.

Last week, Warren said he was motivated to launch the Anti-Hate and Anti-Racism Coalition by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Floyd died after a police officer kneeled on his neck, sparking massive protests against racism and police brutality around the country and world.

Oregon, Arizona St athletes challenge NCAA in federal court

Attorneys filed a lawsuit against the NCAA in federal court Monday that seeks to prevent the association from limiting the amount of money athletes can make off their names, images and likenesses.

The antitrust lawsuit by attorneys representing two current college athletes also seeks damages for potential past earnings athletes have been denied by current NCAA rules. Arizona State swimmer Grant House and Oregon women's basketball player Sedona Prince are the plaintiffs.

They are suing the NCAA and the Power Five Conferences — the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and Southeastern Conference — for unspecified damages. The suit seeks class-action status.

The latest legal challenge comes as the NCAA is the process of changing its rules to allow college athletes to earn money from third parties for things such as social media endorsements, sponsorship deals and personal appearances. The NCAA is also seeking help from Congress in the form of a federal law regarding name, image and likeness compensation that would superseded legislation being pushed at the state level.

Florida's governor signed an NIL bill into law last week that would go into effect July 2021.

The lead attorney in the latest case against the NCAA — Steve Berman from Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro — is a familiar legal foe for the association. His firm has won two antitrust lawsuits against the NCAA in the past decade: the Ed O'Bannon case that challenged the NCAA's use of athletes' names, images and likenesses, and the so-called Alston case that accused the NCAA and major conferences of illegally capping compensation to athletes.

(0) entries

Sign the guestbook.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.